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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 322 (some duplicates have been removed)
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
company for failing to protect local environment. >> 49ers return home to the bay area after falling just a little bit short of making bi biggest come back in super bowl history. >> hear from drivers who didn't get a fair warning from the get a fair warning from the cars woul8ñ# >> [ screaming]. >> it's not the homecoming they wanted but the 49ers are reminded just how much they are appreciated. >> lucky fans even got handshake from coach jim harbaugh leaving 49ers headquarters late today. after returning from new orleans. good evening. 9 remembers back in the bay area after that tough loss. they arrived at 3:30 this afternoon to san jose airport. fans greeted arrival then gather again at 9ers head quarter news, weather and sports santa clara. despite the loss fans happy to cheer on returning players. >> i saw a bunch of players multiple players and i just waved and showed them that they 1 if my book. no matter what. so proud of them. >> do you think they heard the them. >> absolutely. they heard me. anybody that knows me. >> no matter what we love them and we had great year. >> c
to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ so i used my citi thankyou card to pick up some accessories. a new belt. some nylons. and what girl wouldn't need new shoes? and with all the points i've been earning, i was able to get us a flight to our favorite climbing spot, even on a holiday weekend. ♪ things are definitely... looking up. [ male announcer ] with no blackout dates, you can use your citi thankyou points to travel whenever you want. visit citi.com/thankyoucards to apply. about. >> nasa curiosity rover discovered mysterious metal object emerging from rock on the surface of mars. take a look at this bizarre finger like structure science buff say it could be erosion than the surroundings but it's weird. pictures of the object emerge after cures ty drill the first hole in the surface of mars. that is what you are seeing here. hole surrounded by dust. scientist will assess it to see whether it c
by the sheriff that they were trying to give him essentially a forum to express his views and a safe environment to do it in. that was the approach they were take i taking. while they do it, they gather as much information about him as they can. >> and senator smith, i know ethan is two days away from his 6th birthday. i can't imagine a better birthday present for him and his family certainly than to have him safe and reunited tonight. what's your message to the community? how does the community go about recovering from something like this, healing from something like this? >> listen, this is a very strong faith-based community. they've pulled together during this and have just -- there's been an outpouring of love. and i know ethan's mom was very appreciative of all the prayers, very appreciative of the support from all the volunteers. and they were just praying for a very peaceful outcome to this situation. and i know that tonight that the family is just so glad to have ethan back home with them. and we want to thank everyone who had anything to do with that. law enforcement did a wonderful jo
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >> they are being called superstorms. fueled by changing climate, higher temperatures, and rising sea levels. >> climate change is real. it's here. it's going to happen again. >> people and cities once safe. now in the eye of the fury. >> i see the weather changing. absolutely. >> is this the era of the superstorm? >> water level is rising substantially. >> and are we ready? >> if this wall had been here -- >> for the next one? >> i've been telling everybody, the big flood is coming. we better start building the ark. >> living near the ocean, there's always that chance that the ocean is going to come take away everything that you've got. but never did i imagine that this was going to happen to me and my family and my community. >> even now, given all that has happened to him and his family, it is still hard for nick camerada to understand it al
knowledge but for them they live in a very insular environment and that insular environment is one that dictates to make a living and put food in their mouth and just what they're doing and kind of the problem that we have here. there's a demand in the united states for the drugs and there's a demand over there for them to survive and so that's the big picture. >> well, you know, we mentioned drugs and weapons. but what about exotic animals? how big is that industry and how can toure get a dragon? >> i can't help him facilitate anything illegal. >> come on. >> talk to him after the show. >> yeah right. okay. i mean, the thing is, i didn't realize how big the illegal animal trade is but the crime syndicates just as big if not bigger than the biggest drug syndicates in the world and all over in southeast asia and things do trickle back to here but talking about the animal trade, it is really a cultural thing. china's one of the main consumers of these products and what happens is like i went to cambodia, laos, thailand, all these places. these people are raised culturally to eat some
they expect to do things, having difficulties with unfamiliar environments, unfamiliar people, and put exactly into that type of placement, where they have a routine level of anxiety where things don't go the way they want and put into a situation like he has, you know, it's very hard to tell how he's going to do. on the one hand, he might get right back to his routine and do absolutely fine. but on the other hand, you know, the anxieties, the trauma, what we call an acute stress disorder even post traumatic stress symptoms, as we just described, can occur. what's really important is, first, make sure he's safe, make sure he's healthy, make sure had he he has nutrition. whatever medications were given to limb or not given to him. simply to make sure he's healthy initially and stable. and then to get him back to his normal routine, get him back home, get him with his family. and, most importantly, to make sure that he's looked at, as much as love and care is going to be important, we have to make sure that we get him back to his normal routines and that if the anxiety levels are overwhelming, t
, the federal reserve creating this environment where there's few alternatives and it's not necessarily driven by fundamentals. so do fundamentals not matter. >> the fundamentals are still good. we're still looking at fairly attractive, s&p 500, only about 13. i think the fundamentals are there, and the fed hasn't gott gone away yet. the fed hasn't taken await punch bowl yet. >> maria, i would just add that i think earnings have been really very impressive, and that's the big difference in my mind this year versus last year. in addition to all this stimulus, global stimulus, earnings are actually a lot better. i know the expectations were low, but no one was thinking 6% to 7% earnings growth and, okay, fine, revenues are growing at 2.2%, but that tells me margins are actually holding up which is the other case that everyone thought margins were going to roll over, the resiliency in the face of what we just went through in the fourth quarter and i think that's actually very impressive and i think the stocks will continue to work higher as earnings continue to improve. >> you also have to mentio
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> rosa parks was born 100 years ago today. and today her birthday was referred to correctly as national day of courage. the postal service has issued a new stamp in her memory. and today at the henry ford museum in dearborn, michigan where the famous bus is kept, visitors were allowed to take a seat where rosa parks made history. >>> at a new york synagogue, ed koch was remembered as the quintessential new york mayor. it was an emotional service, especially during the remarks of the current mayor, michael bloomberg, who along the way mentioned koch's choice to be buried at trinity cemetery in upper manhattan. think about it, he said, a polish jew in an episcopal graveyard in a largely dominican neighborhood. what could be more new york or more ed koch? they carried the casket out of the church to the tune of the sinat
'm not in a position in this environment in a classified environment i can get more specific. >> jennifer: and the lack of specificity has alarmed some on the left. including democratic senator ron wyden. >> the bottom line is the administration is essentially telling the congress the american people, just trust us and i just don't think that's the standard for oversight. >> jennifer: and that is just a prelude to tomorrow's confirmation hearings for john brennan who is a chief architect for the drone program. senator wyden has been one of john brennan's loudest opponents because of his role in that drone program. and here is another thing that is not going to help the president with the left, is he is now getting praise from the far right. lindsay graham said he was going to author a resolution commending the president's use of drones . . . maybe not the endorsement the president was looking for. so is his liberal appeal strong enough to withstand the outcry over the drones or is it just a narrow group of people? how should progressives feel about drone strikes any
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> some good news tonight about the nasty flu season we've been enduring in this country. cdc says flu activity is down. we have probably, probably seen the worst of the season. flu activity was listed as widespread this week. 38 states at least down from 42 states last week. news remains bad for the elderly, however, with more than 50% of hospitalizations in patients over 65. >>> we got word today jesse jackson jr. has signed a plea agreement with federal prosecutors and has admitted to campaign finance violations. he resigned his house seat he's held for the past 17 years back in november. he acknowledged using campaign contributions to buy personal items, including a rolex watch and furniture. his sentence will be decided by a federal judge and could include still prison time. >>> the bush family, including both for
whyhy away from rapidly growing companies in this environment? >> well, i think what you're seeing is a slow-down in earnings growth. but on the other hand, the economy is doing somewhat better than it was, let's say six months ago. so investors who come into the year looking for very fast earnings growth as justification for their stock prices may be somewhat disappointed. so the economy is getting a little bit better, but wave come out of the recession. we've had a full recovery in profits, so here, going forward, we pect to see slower growth and cnsisncy, think, is the key in that kind of environment. >> tom: you mentioned a full recovery in profits. are stocks, broadly speaking, at this level expensive given the lack of earnings growth that you forecast? >> i don't think they're either expensive or cheap. and the reason i say that is because the standard & poors 500, which is a proxy for the stock market, has about $100 of earnings expected underneath it and it trades at $1500. with the stock market trading at 15 times underlying eaings, that's aut a normal valuation for the ma
the question and what sort of environment them what's what city are you most likely to die in a pool of blood? that's how he put it to his audience, and they compared murdered by strangers, crime, to car crashes and added the two together. portland, vancouver and seattle but in all three places 15% safer in the inner city than you were in the wealthy suburbs because of the combination of those two. and then finally, who talks about asthma? 14 americans die every day from as the. that doesn't sound like a huge amount of its three times rate of the '90s. it's entirely due to automotive exhaust. 90%. pollution isn't what it used to be, the sickest place in america are those places which are the most car dependent, and in phoenix you've got four months out of the year that healthy people are not supposed to leave their houses because the amount of driving going on. so again, what's the solution? finally the most interesting discussion maybe is the environmental discussion, which has turned 180° in the last 10 years. if you look at, even within the global warming discussion, talk about carbon foo
their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ♪ >> pelley: since the killings at sandy hook elementary school there has been a lot of talk about getting guns out of the hands of people not entitled to have them. well, california is trying, but john blackstone has found it's a lot easier said than done. >> reporter: we rode along with special agent john marsh of the state's department of justice as his team prepared to confiscate guns from a man in stockton, california. >> he's a felon, and he has two handguns still registered to him. >> reporter: it's tense work. the people the agents are looking for are convicted felons or mentally unstable, and they have guns. the state has a list of about 20,000 such people with 40,000 guns, but because of budget restrictions there are only 33 agents to find them. you've got a backlog. >> a huge backlog right now. >> reporter: because it takes so much manpower to do this safely. >> yes
some money and the environment at the same time. go shopping. we'll explain just ahead. >> pretty much cloudy all day, but sun is in our future. don't miss the updated first warning forecast with bob. >>> it is cloudy, 52 degrees in central maryland right now. the complete first warning weather forecast is coming up. >>> it was a successful launch into space but the mission is all about earth. alex demetrick reports, land sack eight is the latest experiment of a mission dating back 14 years. >> ignition and lift off. >> reporter: the launch from bande nburg air space was picture perfect right into orbit. >> full thrust, everything is looking good. >> reporter: lan said it would take over satellites launched 14 years ago. >> it's giving us a new look at how the plant is changing due to natural and human effects. >> reporter: like the change in rivers where they swell into floods. and the change in up as cities grow and expand outward. a time lapse covering years and a mission controlled in maryland at the godard flight center. >> the continuity
restricted environment and religious environment. we know people who are narrow minded at a late age. >> you know narrow minded people here at fox? >> two words, book deal, three words, pose for playboy, get a reality show. >> you say there are dollar signs behind it. >> it leads to one of the ame or the oxygen movies. or maybe it is a job at the mall. if you are in this family you can't get a job at the mall. >> also she wants what every other girl has, a gay best friend. after awhile they realize they hate each other. when they come to the real ization they want the gay best friends like the jimmy choo's. >> she is going to call it post hate. >> that would be a reality show i would be interested to watch. >> i am just having fun with you, crazy lady. >> disneyland is more like disney racist land. a trip to a theme park was marred. he approached alice in wonderland's white rabbit and was rebuffed. >> how did that make you feel? >> sad. >> how come? >> because i wanted to hug him. >> his older brother fared no better. >> then i went up to try to hold his hand and he was flicking my hand off.
scouts. their policy has been to protect boys to obviously create not a perfect environment, but one that is in line with what the parents want to ensure that their children are safe when they go out and go in the scouting activity. >> let's go back to that. a time between 1970, 1999. those specific documents, called the perversion files as you know. scouts didn't allow gays, so there is a sense -- isn't that indication in and of itself -- >> you are absolutely right. >> so my point would be, if you are to -- why would it make a difference to open up scouting to people who are gay? >> certainly -- >> had you pedophiles in your ranks in the boy scouts as we have seen from these documents? >> absolutely. you are correct. they have not been able to create the perfect environment, but they have been doing what they can, and had to pay out millions of dollars as a result of that. question they need to ask, will this help accomplish our mission as boy scout leaders and make for a safer environment for the children under our watch? i don't think they can say that. i think that -- >> why not
in the new product is more expensive than other fluids but safer for the environment. checking the stock, how burton down a little bit today. japan airlines grown in the dreamliner will cost the company nearly 7.8 million in revenue. after a battery united flames and smoke. japan airlines said it would seek compensation from boeing for the lost revenue. they have yet to identify the causally battery problems. and the numbers are in for the super bowl. 48.1, better than ever for the nielsen numbers beating last year's giants and patriots. a great game last night. twitter also exploded, 24 million plus about the game. the peak came at halftime when beyoncÉ was performing. dagen: you would think that is the overall, but some people turn their tv sets off during the power outage because it was such a lead, looks like he was stinking. connell: they say the game with the two quick touchdowns right after the power outage and 28-20, so much for this, i will not go to bed, and it went later than we thought because of the power going out. dagen: a little new orleans voodoo working magic against the ra
national debt? with economic growth at best, 3.6%, how will markets behave in that environment? >> i think, overall, the equity markets are looking at substantially lower growth and higher deficits. these negotiations need to work out to be reasonably positive for the financial markets. these projections are really subject to massive change depending on the negotiations. overall, equity investors are basically hunker down for a long period of very slow growth. to, 2.5%. lori: how do you expect markets to react as we go to this budget negotiation? >> equity markets are anticipatory by nature. basically, the report in early december was to ignore these negotiations in washington. i do not think you will see devastating news come out of this process. hopefully we will see something more positive and get on a more sustainable path on the deficit front. in all likelihood, you are not likely to see big changes. lori: what is the best way to be investing around the dow here? >> i do believe that, basically, use pullbacks as a buying opportunity. yesterday was a bit of a reality check for investor
environment -- we did an extensive analysis to try to make sense why we have had the problem and have had so long. host: if you would like to join the conversation from eastern and central time zones -- mountain and pacific -- and if you are a health professional -- laudan aron, here are the numbers, and we see where the united states ranks in life expectancy compared to other countries. who in the study are the comparison points and how the u.s. to? guest: the panel basically compared the health outcomes in the united states to 16 other high-income democracies. it western europe, canada, australia, japan. basically countries we consider our peers in a number of the means. we ranked dead last in life expectancy among males and the comparison group and next-to- last for females. life expectancy at birth is a cumulative indicator of multiple causes of death. but as we can see, we are not doing very well. host: the disadvantage appears to exist across all ages and demographics. do you have a sense of why? guest: well, one of the real striking findings was how many different domains we are falli
, and california institute for energy and environment, and lawrenceburg late national laboratory, for extraordinary leadership in the development of energy efficient building technologies and related standards anthology. [applause] >> jan t. vilcek. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of technology and innovation to jan t. vilcek, new york university school of medicine, for pioneering work on key contributions to the development of therapeutic antibodies. [applause] >> rangaswamy srinivasan. 2011 national medal of technology and innovation this annual them, rangaswamy srinivasan and james wynne, for the pioneering discovery of laser, photo decomposition of human and animal tissue, laying the foundation for laser refractive surgical tech needs that have revolutionized vision enhancement. [applause] >> edward campbell. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of technology and innovation to transport technologies, cambridge, massachusetts, for sustained innovation through the engineering of the first of the kind practical systems in acoustics signal processing and information technology. [applause] >> that wa
process and back to his environment and his world where he can g go back to his friends and enjoy. >> was he a brave young boy during the ordeal? >> absolutely. he is bandle of joy and just a child is a gift from god and something we all should cherish and to me there is no greater gift. like i said, i am a father. >> how did jimmy lee treat him during the ordeal? >> in the beginning he did sort of take care of h him but it deteriorated. he felt like he was in danger. we had to make a decision and we did make that decision and we went in to rescue him. >> at the end, was there resistance or was he sort of at the end of his game and he knew it? >> he was given the opportunity and it didn't work out. >> greta: and new information tonight, police telling us jimmy lee dykes did resist capture at the end. they say he engaged in a fire fight with the s.w.a.t. agents as they entered the bunker. he had reenforced the bunker against any attempt ited entry by law enforcement. >>> the jury hears from a woman accused of murdering her ex-boyfriend in the shower. jodi arias talks about her sexu
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ...it's my job to look after it. thyou eat less...ing weiyou lose weight.et. it's a great plan... until you get hungry. that's the time to take slimful. one tasty 90-calorie slimful and a glass of water satisfies hunger for hours making it easier to eat smaller meals, and resist snacking. your friends might think you found the secret to losing weight. but it's no secret... it's slimful. eating less is a beautiful thing. >> geraldo: this is a fox news alert. it appears that the fugitive dorner inistopher dorlander in l.a. abandoned his pickup truck and set foot on a fire road. because the vehicle which was reportedly filled with survival gear and an arsenal of heavy weapons had a broken axel. that was three days ago. but because he is on foot the odds are he is still up in that rugged forest fr
. >> reporter: matt keen and headed the team at aero environment that developed the humming bird for the department of defense. it weighs less than an ounce. >> the video camera is tucked in about the neck. >> reporter: so here's the question. do you think it's really cool or does it scare you? >> endurance is a few minutes. that's what it does. ♪ oh, my darling, oh, my darling ♪ >> osgood: coming up a golden oldy. the singing telegram. >> you're my darling valentine. with the fidelity guided portfolio summary you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. stouffer's is proud to make america's favorite lasagna... with hand-layered pasta, tomatoes and real mozzarella cheese. but what makes us even prouder... is what our real dinners can do for your family. stouffer's. le
too in a negative real interest rate environment but we are a little bit more underweight this year than we were last year just because we think the risk of economic global calamity is certainly less than it was at this time last year. so don't see gold as strong as it was last year. david: kevin, this is what i don't understand about the current market. a lot of people say it is not going to be growing this year as much as it was last year. last year we had all the uncertainty. uncertainty about europe. uncertainty who would get elected in the state. uncertainty if the president was reelected what would happen with taxes. we have a lot of uncertainty nailed down or more or less so. we still have questions about the debt, et cetera. with more certainty now why isn't the market set to increase as much this year as it did last year? >> well, when you get, when you have more risk you have more reward, right? when you have more certainty, certainty l certainly we've seen a rally on that. but we would be surprised we saw the returns for 2013 like we did in 2012 because there was more unc
and afghanistan. the goal is to create a more stable environment for when nato forces leave afghanistan in 2014. the mission is to get the taliban to negotiate peace, but what are the chances? >> 12 years into a war that has cost 440 british lives, the prime minister invited the leaders of both afghanistan and pakistan to talk about the threats facing them all. >> the united kingdom will continue to stand firmly behind both countries as they work together to bring peace and stability to the region. finally, the progress we have achieved today sends a very clear message to the taliban. now is the time for everyone to participate in a peaceful political process in afghanistan. >> as british troops prepared to withdraw from afghanistan and handoff to afghan forces, intense combat like this is rare now. the military believe they have done their job and that this insurgency, like all others, needs a political solution. >> the clock is ticking. we have until the end of 2014, maybe not as long as that, to get this thing sorted out, because we are leaving, and everyone knows it. >> however unpalatable,
housing and job, and he understood that. that is what he was trying to create in the environment. >> speaking of education, there is a high school, one of the best in the city of chicago named after whitney young and the first lady went to and graduated from whitney young high school, and what do you believe he would say about violence in schools? >> that the job is not done enough to have people have a stake in their communities enou enough, and also to try to build bridges between never the community, and between the people who are disempowered with the jobs they need to become stakeholders, but he would also say to the people who are in the chambers of commerce that you have a vested interest in protect ing t protecting the city, too. so i think that this is the kind of bridge building that he did. it was not about black or white, but that we all have a stake in this together. so he would be trying to find the points of consensus where things could get done and better housing jobs and so forth could empower young people to not become violent. >> given how inclusive he was, he
. a lot of our transactions are coming from the international environment. buyers from brazil, buyers from europe in general. it is definitely helping the florida market. i would say a large percentage. a lot of these deals are coming from people migrating from colder climates. i have a lot of snowbirds coming down here. florida is looking more and more attractive. regard to the luxury market, it is doing extremely well. of course, you do not have the obstacle you have in the lower-priced market because you have a lot of cash buyers. a lot of people who continue to have money. that way you are continuing to see a lot of these bidding wars. dagen: i have heard stories. i have heard stories in terms of miami, particularly. the condo hotels became a very tricky proposition when the financing dried out. are you seeing some of the financing come back for those properties? >> not specifically. a lot of developers are staying away from those properties. i have seen many developers planning new projects. the condo hotel market has really not revamped the same way. you are just being straight up co
$84. they talked about payroll tax increases. it is in a more competitive environment. the easy way for walmart is over. a little bit of a pullback is expected. back to you. melissa: thank you so much. a big month in january. we get to the bottom line with elizabeth macdonald. why is this? >> you have been talking about that great rotation. we have not seen a start like this in 15 years. in the month of january alone. it surpasses what happened all of last year combined for all four quarters. the bears have left the building. the s&p forward earnings that we are looking at are still cheap versus the october 27 peak. the s&p 500 was trading at 13. if it hits 14, then you are talking s&p 1600. if it hits 16, you are talking s&p 1700. are we setting up a classic bear trap? that stock has gotten ahead of the economic recovery. we are seeing the togo war on whether or not we will have a downdraft by end of year. melissa: who is winning? >> though bulls are winning for now. if there is a pullback there, you could be in a downdraft air up. melissa: thank you so much. lori: this has been th
with that. now is a great time for opportunity. >> what about the idea that the regulatory environment is getting tougher from the epa to the financial regulators, dodd-frank, basel. business faces a different situation than decades ago. >> i don't think so. i remember acquisitions with at&t we didn't know. it was tough. we spent a great deal of time in the political and regulatory part of the business. it was touch and go. i'm not sure it change sod much. >> okay. what about the global story? people say in the last several decades, you know, american business was really riding a wave of globalization. today you're more likely to hear about jobs in buffalo and in michigan than in bangalore, india. are economies looking inward? >> i think so. there are some coming back. that's a good sign. >> you think it's a good sign that it's not the globalization openness we saw a few years ago and now economies are looking inward? >> glad to see us bring jobs back to this country and rethink that. that's helpful. >> final question. what do you drive? you driving a gm? >> i am driving a gtm cadillac
's go along or get along. it turns into a weird almost brazil like environment where you are basically -- you can't give homeowners money for their mortgage programs because that would create moral hazard while you are handing trillions to banks because they are too big to go after. this is the one of core ideological things we ran into. when it came to the banks anything and everything was on the table. saving the banks of priority one, two and three. tarp was supposed to help homeowners. it was supposed spo help almost 4 million people stay their homes. the justifications for not doing the right thing, not reducing principle, not fulfilling the promise. we can't help an undeserving homeowner. that would be terrible. the financial institutions that rode this country into the ditch, the unemployment -- that's not what get themes money. let's make sure they are able to pay their billions in bonuses because that might upset the system. it was an incredible double standard. >> jon: it's a bizarre way of treating -- the people created the crisis have to be coddled because you never know wh
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 322 (some duplicates have been removed)